Resolution in Communication: 5 steps to effective negotation resolution

I recently attended a police hostage negotiation workshop that shed light on the extreme circumstances that could require effective negotiation. Two representatives from Hampshire Police gave a talk on their experiences with negotiating in dangerous situations with vulnervable people. The main ‘take-away’ from the workshop was the skill to listen.

A 5 step process was given by the representatives to help understand the key factors that make up effective negotiation.

5 step processThe first step is ‘Emotional Intelligence’, which means understanding the circumstances of the situation you are trying to negotiate.
The second step is ‘Intitial contact’. It is important to use warm welcoming open lines to introduce yourself.
The third step is to build raport with the person through ‘Empathy’.
Fourthly, ‘Trust’ needs to be gained through continuation of the third step.
And finally, the fifth step is to effectively ‘persuade to solve the problem’. Through all the steps listening should be the number one skill used.

This five step process contrasts Saner’s key factors of negotiation (2000), which takes a more aggressive approach:
Coercion: using force, or the threat of force to wrestle concessions from an opponent.
Opening strong: starting out with a position that is higher than what you realistically estimate you can achieve.
Salami tactics: prolonging a negotiation to a painstakingly slow pace, only giving a very small concession to the other side when it can no longer be avoided in order to placate the other side for a little while longer.

Do you think these steps are useful?

What other factors are important for resolving conflict through negotiation?

Negotiation in practice:

Heineken set up a challenge where guys had to convince their girlfriends to purchase stadium seats using the power of negotiation. The result is humorous and show how difficult negotiation can be at times. Have a look and find out if they managed to or not:

What do you think of the video?

‘Look at me’… as I look at you: Facial Recognition Billboards

A campaign that launched yesterday in Canary Warf, London used creative billboards to raise awareness of the fight against domestic violence. The campaign was created by London agency WCRS who teamed up with Women’s Aid and Ocean Outdoor to coincide with International Women’s Day this Sunday. 



What’s so amazing about the billboards?

As a way of taking digital advertisements to a new level of creativity facial recognition is being used to recognize when people are paying attention to the ad. As more people look at the billboard, the bruises and cuts displayed on a models face heal faster. The aim of this is to communicate the benefit of not turning a blind eye to the problem and recognising the importance of doing something to stop domestic violence when you can see it happening. . 

Despite the campaign only premiering yesterday the advertisment has already won an Interactive Award in Ocean’s annual Art of Outdoor competition 2014. 

Women’s Aid and Ocean Amplify the Violent Face of Abuse from Ocean Outdoor on Vimeo.

I think this is a great way of using this technology for raising awareness of an important issue, rather than just targeting us with the right products. I often write blog posts about creative campaigns that I think shine within the industry and this is definitely one of them. A conventional billboard would have gained awareness but this digital communication takes it to the next level and will really make people think. 

What do you think?

Story found at adweek.com 

Negotiation in Communication – Good vs. Bad

—Negotiation is an interpersonal decision-making process necessary whenever we cannot achieve our objective single-handily’ (Thompson, 2005). This post compares two case studies of negotiation and analyses how one has managed negotiation effectively and the other ineffectively.

GOOD

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WHO: Scottish Referendum

WHAT: ‘If you don’t know, then you have to vote No’.

WHEN: Thursday 18 September 2014

RESULT: Scotland remains part of the UK because more people voted No. 55.3% voted No and 44.7% voted Yes. It is said that Gordon Browns speech at the “Love Scotland Vote No” rally in Glasgow swayed the votes towards No to independence. Brown spoke of choosing No because of love for Scotland and love for the future and one point that stood out to many was ‘If you don’t know, then you have to say No.’ The majority of campaigns were targeted at the No or Yes camps and little attention was given for the people who were unsure or had unanswered questions and Brown reaching out to these people is said to have been the tipping point in votes towards No. Political speeches are a great way to negotiate and if done effectively they can make a massive difference, proven by this case study.

VS

BAD

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WHO: Apple and Samsung

WHAT: Samsung in patent violations of Apple IPhone trial

WHEN: 2012

RESULT: A California jury ruled that Samsung would have to pay Apple more than $1 billion in damages for patent violations of Apple products, particularly its iPhone. However, the negotiation was not handled well and the cost would be further argued until the judge dropped the charge to $600 million. After this the negotiation had still not been settled and in November 2013, another jury ruled that Samsung would have to pay Apple $290 million of the amount overruled by the judge in the 2012 case. Despite the pay-out finally being settled this didn’t resolve the conflict as a court-ordered mediation between the CEOs of the two companies in 2012 ended in impasse and the disputants continue to fight in courts worldwide.

RECCOMMENDATIONS: In terms of Samsung managing to negotiate the cost of the pay-out down lower, there was still the issue that the original negotiation was unsuccessful resulting in the trial lasting longer than necessary. The cost should have been negotiated at the first trial and agreed to by both parties with a coinciding agreement to end the conflict between the organisations to prevent future court cases.

What do you think of these two examples?

What do you think could have been done better to resolve the Samsung vs. Apple negotiation quicker?

Can you think of any examples of negotiation that stand out for being good or bad?

 

References
THOMPSON, L. 2005. The mind and heart of the negotiator. Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Pearson/Prentice Hall.—
HARVARD LAW SCHOOL, 2015. Top Business Negotiations of 2013: Apple versus Samsung [online] [viewd on 24th February 2015] [Available at: http://www.pon.harvard.edu/daily/business-negotiations/top-business-negotiations-of-2013-apple-versus-samsung/%5D
GOV.UK, 2015. Scottish Independence Referendum Archived [online] [viewd on 24th February 2015] [available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/topical-events/scottish-independence-referendum/about%5D
BROWN, G, 2015. Gordon Brown’s speech at the “Love Scotland Vote No” rally in Glasgow [online] [viewed on 24th February 2015] [available at: http://gordonandsarahbrown.com/2014/09/gordon-browns-speech-at-the-love-scotland-vote-no-rally-in-glasgow/%5D
Photo credits:
http://www.pcworld.com/article/261285/apple_v_samsung_five_experts_five_questions.html
http://gordonandsarahbrown.com/2014/09/gordon-browns-speech-at-the-love-scotland-vote-no-rally-in-glasgow/

Conflict in Communication – Media Misrepresentation

‘Journalists should be honest and courageous in gathering, reporting and interpreting information.’  

This quote is taken from the Code of Conduct for journalists as set out by the Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ), however is this a set rule or simply a guideline that is often over looked?

Christopher-Jefferies-007Bearing this in mind I want to raise the case study of Christopher Jefferies, an innocent man wrongly accused for involvement in Joanna Yeates’ murder. Not only was Jefferies accused of murder but was also vilified by the press through harassment, false accusations, and out-right lies.

Even after Jefferies was released on bail the media continued to publish articles that included ‘‘seriously defamatory” allegations and persuaded the audience to doubt his innocence, with articles using ill-gained quotes such as, ‘weird’, ‘strange’, and ‘peeping tom.’ Journalists and paparazzi camped outside his home and followed him around whenever he would try to leave to the point where Jefferies accused them of harassment chris_jefferies_sun_mirrorand invasion of privacy. Jefferies was later released from bail and the police released a statement that he was no longer a suspect, however the tormenting didn’t end there. Jefferies had been accused of many things within the misleading articles and many of his close friends had been persuaded by the press not to trust him. Jefferies was told about how he could sue the press for their witch-hunt and by taking up a legal battle against 8 newspapers, Jefferies won an undisclosed libel pay-out that is said to be ‘substantial’ and received an official apology from the police and the press industry. In July, the Daily Mirror was fined £50,000 and the Sun £18,000 for contempt of court over their coverage of Jefferies.

What price do you put on a person’s reputation? Jefferies speaking after the ordeal said, ‘It was like having your personality left in ruins.’

How is it fair to make an innocent person feel like this? Especially when it is said that you are innocent until proven guilty…

What do you think?

A two-part TV series was produced that would show the case from start to finish and would highlight the ‘destructive nature’ of the press. I recommend watching the series as I found it very eye-opening. Part 1 and Part 2.

All the quotes and facts were found by researching articles available at: http://www.theguardian.com/uk/christopher-jefferies

Experience: Client Meeting

As part of the Digital PR module of my course I had to attend a client meeting with my fellow campaign group members. The client meeting was last friday and was a chance for myself and my group members to show Naomi Garrathy, from FiveByFive agency, and Fiona Phelan, from CooperVision, our ideas and main strategy for the campaign.

To start the module off we visited FiveByFive agency in Southampton who focus on digital communications. They set two briefs with the focus of building a digital relationship with consumers. One brief was for CooperVision Lenses and the other for Welchs fruit juice. In groups of 4 we had to pitch to the rest of the course in an attempt to win the brief that we wanted to create a campaign for. My group made up of myself, Paige Hiley, Chloe Attwood, and Trine Larsen chose to pitch for the CooperVision brief, which we were proud to win. After we won the pitch it was time to get started on generating ideas, key messages and the main strategy for the campaign. The brief is focused on developing a digital relationship and driving consumers to CooperVision website.

The client meeting was scheduled last friday (22nd November) as a way of giving us experience in that type of situation, and also an opportunity to share our main ideas and strategy with .. and Fiona. My group was chosen to be filmed and shown to potential students looking to start at the university to study PR. It was a great experience and my group was very proud of ourselves for how well it went. The meeting was more of an informal conversation about our ideas and gave us the confidence to continue with our proposed ideas for the campaign.

Below are a couple of photos of my group during the client meeting taken for the SolentPR instagram page:

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We received some great comments back about our efforts in the meeting and I personally feel that it was a great experience to learn from and to have when progressing through the course.

I hope I’ll be able to get a copy of the video soon, which I will post to show what content was discussed.

If you’re interested in finding out more about what I’m getting up to as part of my uni course then follow my twitter account for frequent updates: @helencummingspr

A Month That Passed in a Second

The aim of this post is to give a brief summary of some of the exciting things I’ve been up to since returning to uni in September. It’s been a while since my last post due to the manic blur of returning as a second year student. The return to uni has been rushed and stressful but of course, it’s been great.

The first month back for second year passed so quickly, it was october before I knew it. And now it’s November! Time is just whizzing by and the assignments are starting to pile on. The first 3 weeks back at uni were very calm and everyone had that fresh spring of optimism in their stride. 4 weeks in and that had well and truly disappeared.

So here’s a quick timeline breakdown of the first 2 months back at uni:

1st and 2nd week: Assignments are set and the routine of lectures sinks in

3rd week: FiveByFive agency visit

4th week: Group meetings start and assignments start to come together

5th week: Tim Leroy, Marketing Director from Novatech – guest speaker

6th week: Lemon Squeezy freelance guest speaker

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I just want to mention how good the visit to FiveByFive agency was during week 3. FiveByFive is a local PR and communications agency with a focus on digital media. They set our brief to us which we later had to pitch for. The meeting was a great success and the whole course looked very smart and on form. Here’s all of us waiting to go in and get the meeting started. (I’m second in on the right)

The freelance guest speaker from Lemon Squeezy is coming up tomorrow which is very exciting and a great opportunity to find out about freelance work and compare it to the agency environment we’ve already seen at FiveByFive.

I’ve got a few ideas for a couple of blog posts that I want to do soon and will try my best to find time to get them posted. I’ve now managed to get myself a part-time job alongside my studies so I’m lucky to have more than a half day free. This ‘adult’ thing is hard work!